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Chuẩn bị tâm lý cho những biến cố

Discussion in 'Chia sẻ buồn vui' started by nvha, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Tôi không có ý định làm chùn bước các bạn đang hăm hở nộp đơn bởi những tin như dưới đây, mà chỉ muốn chia sẻ một thực tế, và hy vọng mỗi người có sự chuẩn bị tinh thần, tâm lý, được tư vấn phù hợp cho những tình huống khó khăn...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/17/education/17cornell.html?ref=homepage&src=me&pagewanted=print

    March 16, 2010
    After 3 Suspected Suicides, Cornell Reaches Out
    By TRIP GABRIEL


    ITHACA, N.Y. — All weekend, Cornell University’s residential advisers knocked on dorm rooms to inquire how students were coping.

    On Monday and Tuesday, the start of a stressful exam week before spring break, professors interrupted classes to tell students they cared for them not just academically, but personally. Both days, the university president, Dr. David J. Skorton, took out a full-page ad in the campus paper, The Cornell Daily Sun, saying: “Your well-being is the foundation on which your success is built. If you learn anything at Cornell, please learn to ask for help.”

    The university is on high alert about the mental health of its students after the apparent suicides of three of them in less than a month in the deep gorges rending the campus. The deaths, two on successive days last week, have cast a pall over the university and revived talk of Cornell’s reputation — unsupported, say officials — as a high-stress “suicide school.”

    “I think everybody’s kind of shaken. I know I am,” said Nicole Wagner, a 19-year-old freshman from Newport Beach, Calif. “I wanted to go home.”

    She was crossing the Thurston Avenue Bridge, which was strewn with red carnations and affixed with fresh stickers for a suicide prevention telephone line.

    On Thursday, the body of a sophomore engineering student, William Sinclair, of Chevy Chase, Md., was recovered from the rugged gorge more than 70 feet below the bridge, where the fierce waters of Fall Creek sluice through a narrow corridor. The body of Bradley Ginsburg, a freshman from Boca Raton, Fla., was found in the same vicinity on Feb. 17.

    Then on Friday, Matthew Zika, a junior engineering student from Lafayette, Ind., died when he dropped from a suspension foot bridge a short distance downstream, according to the university. Rescue workers have yet to recover his body in the rain-swollen creek.

    The Ithaca Police Department is investigating both of last week’s deaths, but the university is responding as if they were suicides. Besides aggressive mental health outreach, Cornell has stationed guards on the bridges through the end of the week.

    “While we know that our gorges are beautiful features of our campus, they can be scary places at times like this,” Susan Murphy, the vice president for student and academic services, said in a video message posted on a new Web site, caringcommunity.cornell.edu.

    As disturbing as the recent deaths are, they are just the latest of 10 by enrolled students this academic year, including deaths from illness, accident and no fewer than six ruled as suicides by the county medical examiner or still under investigation, according to campus officials.

    Last Thursday, e-mail blasts went out to 35,000 students and faculty and staff members acknowledging Mr. Sinclair’s death, followed by a message to parents and one from the college president.

    “Unbelievably, shockingly, we had to do the same thing the next day,” said Thomas Bruce, the vice president for communications.

    Despite the half-dozen known or suspected suicides this year, Timothy Marchell, a clinical psychologist in Cornell’s campus health services whose specialties include suicide, said that, historically, Cornell suicides have not been higher than what national statistics predict for a university population of 20,000 students: about two per year.

    Between 2000 and 2005, there were 10 confirmed suicides, Dr. Marchell said, and from the beginning of 2006 through the beginning of this academic year, there were none.

    Dr. Marchell said he was “well acquainted with the perception of Cornell as a suicide school,” having grown up in Ithaca and graduated from Cornell. But it is an urban legend, he said, largely fueled by the fact that suicides there are often shockingly public.

    “When someone dies by suicide in a gorge, it’s a very visible public act,” he said.

    Cornell’s mental health outreach in recent years, which has attracted national attention, is intended to bring students who are at risk, and who might not seek help, into counseling. Custodians are trained to look for signs of emotional trouble when cleaning out dorms; therapists hold open-door hours at 10 campus locations; and a faculty handbook advises professors about how to spot students’ distress in its many contemporary forms, from disturbing artwork to clothes that disguise self-mutilation.

    Despite these efforts, Dr. Skorton said in an interview, “We are not getting the job done,” adding that suicide among young people is a national health crisis and is not specific to one campus. Administrators at Cornell have been “very intensively reassessing” existing programs in recent weeks, he said.

    Around campus, students and staff wondered whether some combination of familiar stresses — the long upstate New York winter, classroom demands of an Ivy League university — and new factors, like the evaporation of internships and jobs for graduates during a bleak recession, had provoked the recent deaths.

    Dr. Marchell cautioned that it is almost impossible to link broad causes to suicide rates, that “the psychology of suicide can be very individual.”

    He and others, however, are concerned that students’ deaths may lower barriers for others who are contemplating it. “We have to be thinking about the potential influence on the collective psychology,” he said.

    Mr. Zika, the most recent to die, was remembered by friends not as lonely and stressed-out, but as quick to laugh and a caring friend — he drove for hours during the recent winter break from New York to Indiana visiting friends, recalled Deirdre Mulligan, one of those he dropped in on.

    Mr. Zika, who had been a star baseball player in high school, played Ultimate Frisbee with Cornell friends, wrote poetry on his Facebook page and had a tattoo with a lyric from the rock band Incubus: “If the wind blew me in the right direction, would I even care? I would.”

    Nicole Huynh, a freshman who began dating Mr. Zika last semester, said in an e-mail message: “During this current semester, some who knew him more than others could see he was having a rough time. He’d talk, but it wasn’t as much. He slept more than usual. Didn’t feel motivated about some things. Tried distancing himself, little by little.”

    She does not think the stress of studies pushed him to the edge, but rather troubles he carried from early in life. She suspected he was having suicidal thoughts, and both she and Ms. Mulligan said close friends had urged him to seek counseling, but they did not know if he did. The university declined to comment, citing privacy laws.

    Ms. Huynh said she and Mr. Zika agreed to suspend their relationship a few weeks ago as he pushed her away.

    “Many people listened and cared a lot about him,” Ms. Huynh said. “But no matter how great his support system was, his mind was set, and he was going to do whatever he wanted to do.”
     
  2. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Allege negligence in health services’ drug prescription

    Mọi người hết sức lưu ý và cẩn trọng với tác dụng phụ của thuốc, không chỉ với thuốc chống trầm cảm


    http://www.boston.com/yourtown/well.../04/kin_sue_harvard_over_sons_suicide?mode=PF

    Kin sue Harvard over son’s suicide
    Allege negligence in health services’ drug prescription
    By Shelley Murphy, Globe Staff | December 4, 2009

    Harvard sophomore John Edwards was studying to become a doctor and training for the Boston Marathon in June 2007 when he sought help at the university’s Health Services because he could not study for as many hours as some of his friends.

    A nurse practitioner prescribed a drug to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a condition the overachieving Edwards had never been diagnosed with. Later, she prescribed two powerful antidepressants, Prozac and Wellbutrin, when he began complaining of anxiety, depression, and other side effects. Meanwhile, he was taking a fourth drug for acne, Accutane, that has been linked to suicidal thoughts.

    “The Wellbutrin is having the effect that we were seeking . . . but unfortunately I feel like it has canceled out the anxiety-reducing effects of the fluoxetine [Prozac], as recently I’ve been pretty nervous,’’ Edwards wrote in a Nov. 27, 2007, e-mail to the nurse practitioner, Marianne Cannon. “Let me know if I should schedule to come in and meet with you soon, or if I should change the med plan.’’

    Cannon replied that she was concerned and told Edwards to schedule an appointment with her. Two days later, Edwards, 19, of Wellesley committed suicide in a bathroom at Harvard Medical School by suffocating himself with a plastic bag.

    His father, John B. Edwards II of Wellesley, filed a suit Wednesday in Middlesex Superior Court alleging gross negligence by Cannon; Dr. Georgia Ede, who was the doctor who supervised her; and Harvard College, for causing his son’s wrongful death

    Harvard released a statement yesterday, saying, “We understand how difficult it must be for John Edwards’ family to cope with such a tragic loss, but we are confident that the care he received at Harvard University Health Services was thorough and appropriate and he was monitored closely by its physicians and allied health specialists.’’

    Lisa G. Arrowood, a Boston attorney who represents Edwards, said, “We’re alleging that the supervising physician in this case did not do her job, which was to supervise the nurse who didn’t have medical training that a physician has. She was writing prescriptions for powerful drugs that were inappropriate in this combination and are associated with an increase of suicide.’’

    The US Food and Drug Administration has warned that anyone taking Accutane, Prozac, or Wellbutrin should be monitored closely for suicidal thoughts.

    “If a college such as Harvard cannot properly care for somebody like Johnny, I think it’s very concerning who can,’’ Edwards’s father said. “They are leaders in medicine and psychiatry, and it’s just astounding that at a school such as Harvard that something like this could happen.’’

    Edwards was class president and valedictorian of Wellesley High School class of 2006 and played on the school’s championship tennis team. His father said he was an A student at Harvard and was conducting stem cell research at Harvard Medical School.

    He said he “thought it was bizarre’’ when his son told him he had been prescribed medication for attention deficit disorder, because “he never had an attention issue.’’

    The suit accuses Cannon of prescribing Adderall, an amphetamine, which caused Edwards to have chest pains and anxiety, then several months later prescribing Prozac and then Wellbutrin, even though Edwards told her he had taken Prozac when he was younger and experienced “out-of-control feelings.’’

    Edwards said his son was upset by a break-up with a girlfriend two months earlier, but there was no indication he contemplated taking his own life. He was training for the marathon and had created a Harvard College Marathon Challenge Web page, with a goal of raising $2,000 for two charities. “In six months, I hope to cross the finish line of the Boston Marathon,’’ Edwards wrote.

    His father said he last saw him when he dropped him off at his dorm two days after Thanksgiving. “He seemed to be in a good mood,’’ Edwards said. “I gave him a kiss on the head and hugged him. He hugged me. I told him I loved him and left. He seemed to be fine.’’

    Edwards said his son, a guitarist, was planning to perform “High and Dry’’ by Radiohead with a friend at a talent show the night after his death. The show was canceled because of the suicide, then held three months later. His only sister, Julia, now 16, learned the song and played it in his memory.

    Edwards said he always hated to run, but after his son’s death he started training and ran the Boston Marathon this year.

    “I put some of Johnny’s ashes in my back pocket,’’ Edwards said, his voice cracking. “Together we ran the marathon.’’

    Shelley Murphy can be reached at shmurphy@globe.com.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  3. thquangvn

    thquangvn Member MBA Family

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    Đây chủ yếu là các em undergrad anh ạ, dân MBA thì chơi nhiều hơn
     
  4. Quang

    Quang Pocketful of Sunshine Administrator MBA Family

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    Quang nói thế nào ấy. Undergrad mới chơi nhiều chứ, có pressure gì đâu.

     
  5. Diep

    Diep Member MBA Family

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    Undergrad pressure nhiều lắm ạ :D, làm sao phải vừa chơi nhiều cho bằng bạn bằng bè mà vẫn kiếm được việc làm tốt.
    Hì, em đùa tí thôi, em nghĩ undergrad thì dễ tự tử bởi vì vẫn còn "ngông cuồng và khờ dại", kinh nghiệm ít nên kì vọng quá cao về bản thân và thấy không đạt được cái gì thì nghĩ là đã đến tận cùng của thế giới rồi :)
     
  6. thienthu16

    thienthu16 New Member Pre-family

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    Mình có đọc đâu đó 1 câu đại khái rằng "People often prepare themselves for pre-MBA and post-MBA. They don't know what they're going through during the MBA course. It's gonna tough, sometimes tougher than life".
    Mình thấy ngoài việc chuẩn bị admission vào trường, và định hướng nghề nghiệp rõ ràng sau khi tốt nghiệp, mọi người nên chuẩn bị sẵn tinh thần chiến đấu trong thời gian học ở đó. Vừa học, vừa kiếm tiền làm thêm, vừa phải cố gắng hòa nhập, tạo networking thì cũng..căng thẳng nhỉ
     
  7. Quang

    Quang Pocketful of Sunshine Administrator MBA Family

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    Anh nói sinh viên Mỹ ấy chứ. Chứ còn international students thì lúc nào mà chẳng pressure, cơm áo gạo tiền đủ cả.

     
  8. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Sự hiểu biết có thể giúp Bạn và những người xung quanh.

    Pls visit www.helpguide.org


    If You’re Feeling Suicidal…
    ADVICE TO GET YOU THROUGH

    If you’re feeling suicidal, call for help!
    1-800-273-TALK

    If you’re not ready to make that call, remember that suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. When you’re feeling extremely depressed or suicidal, problems don’t seem temporary – they seem overwhelming and permanent. But with time, you will feel better, especially if you reach out for help

    In This Article:
    • Some things to consider
    • Reaching out for help
    • Ways to cope with suicidal thoughts and feelings
    • Related links

    If you are concerned that a friend or family member is contemplating suicide, see Suicide Prevention: Understanding and Helping a Suicidal Person.
    Some things to consider

    Feeling suicidal does not make you a bad person.
    Thoughts of ending your own life do not necessarily mean that you truly want to die—they mean, rather, that you have more pain than you can cope with right now. The pain of deep depression is intense. It is too much to bear for long periods of time.
    What might be bearable to someone else may not be to you.
    Many kinds of emotional pain may lead to thoughts of suicide. The reasons for this pain are unique to every person, and whether or not the pain is bearable differs from person to person. But even if you’re in a lot of pain, give yourself some distance between thoughts and action. Make a promise to yourself, "I will wait 24 hours and won't do anything drastic during that time." Or, wait a week.

    Thoughts and actions are two different things—your suicidal thoughts do not have to become a reality. There is no deadline. There's no time limit, no one pushing you to act on these thoughts right now. Wait. Wait and put some distance between your suicidal thoughts and suicidal action.

    Reaching out for help
    You can choose to live, but first it is important that you find some relief from your pain. To do that, you will need to find a way to increase your connections with people who will listen. Even if it doesn't feel like it right now, there are many people who want to support you during this difficult time. They won't try to argue with you about how miserable you feel or to just "snap out of it". They will not judge you. They will simply listen and be there for you.

    Reach out to just one person. Do it now. Use your 24 hours or your week, to tell someone what's going on with you. You can call a trusted friend, family member, minister, rabbi, doctor, or therapist. It doesn’t matter who it is, as long as it’s someone you trust and who is likely to listen with compassion and acceptance.

    If you don’t know who to turn to:

    Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or the National Hopeline Network at 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433). These toll-free crisis hotlines offer 24-hour suicide prevention and support. Your call is free and confidential.

    Even if your suicidal feelings have subsided, get help for yourself. Experiencing that sort of emotional pain is itself a traumatizing experience. Finding a support group or therapist can be very helpful in developing strong coping resources for the future.

    Ways to cope with suicidal thoughts and feelings
    Remember that while it may feel as if the depression will never end, depression is never a permanent condition. You WILL feel better again. In the meantime, here are some things you can do to cope with your suicidal thoughts and feelings:

    • Talk with someone every day, preferably face to face. Though you feel like withdrawing, ask trusted friends and acquaintances to spend time with you.
    • Spend time with people who aren't depressed. This can lift you up and make you feel better.
    • If you are thinking of taking an overdose, give your medicines to someone who can give them to you one day at a time.
    • Remove any dangerous objects or weapons from your home.
    • Avoid alcohol and other drugs. They will only make you feel worse.
    • Wait until you are feeling better before doing things you find difficult or unpleasant.
    • Make a written schedule for yourself every day and stick to it, no matter what.
    • Don't skip meals, and get at least eight hours of sleep each night.
    • Get out in the sun or into nature for at least 30-minutes a day.
    • Make time for things that bring you joy.

    To Learn More: Related Helpguide Articles
    • Suicide Prevention: Understanding and Helping a Suicidal Person
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/suicide_prevention.htm

    • Recovering from Depression: Self-Help and Coping Tips
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_tips.htm

    • Helping a Depressed Person: Taking Care of Yourself while Supporting a Loved One
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/living_depressed_person.htm

    • Understanding Depression: Spotting the Signs and Symptoms and Getting Help
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_signs_types_diagnosis_treatment.htm

    • Professional Help for Depression: Diagnosis and Treatment Options
    Side Effects, Safety, and Treatment Guidelines
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/treatment_strategies_depression.htm

    • Antidepressant Medications:
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/medications_depression.htm


    Related links for coping with suicidal thoughts and feelings

    Crisis lines and help
    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - Suicide prevention telephone hotline funded by the U.S. government. Provides free, 24-hour assistance. 1-800-273-TALK (8255).



    National Hopeline Network - Toll-free telephone number offering 24-hour suicide crisis support. 1-800-SUICIDE (784-2433)


    State Prevention Programs – Browse through a database of suicide prevention programs, organized by state. (National Strategy for Suicide Prevention)

    Crisis Centers in Canada – Locate suicide crisis centers in Canada by province. (Centre For Suicide Prevention)

    Befrienders Worldwide – International suicide prevention organization connects people to crisis hotlines in their country.

    If you are feeling suicidal

    If you are thinking about suicide, read this first – Provides several excellent fact sheets about suicide, from a page geared towards people who are considering suicide to information about maintaining recovery and healing. (Metanoia)

    If you are feeling suicidal – A fact sheet to help if you are feeling suicidal. (Big Bend 211)

    Stop A Suicide, Today – Includes a self-assessment questionnaire, tips for friends, sections for professionals and survivors, and links to other resources. (StopaSuicide.org)

    Jaelline Jaffe, Ph.D., Robert Segal, and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D., contributed to this article. Last modified: November 07.
     
  9. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Thuốc chống trầm cảm và những tác dụng phụ

    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/medications_depression.htm#sideeffects

    Antidepressants
    What You Need to know About Depression Medication


    If you’re suffering from major depression, antidepressant medication may relieve some of your symptoms. Antidepressants aren’t a silver bullet for depression, and they come with their own side effects and dangers. Plus, recent studies have raised questions about their effectiveness.
    Learning the facts about antidepressants and weighing the benefits against the risks can help you make an informed and personal decision about whether medication is right for you.
    In This Article:
    • Chemical imbalance theory
    • Effectiveness
    • Side effects
    • Antidepressant withdrawal
    • Suicide risk
    • Other treatment options
    • Deciding if medication is right for you
    • If you use antidepressants
    • Related links

    This information is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice. If you are taking an antidepressant, Do not change your dosage without consulting your physician!

    Is depression caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain?
    You’ve seen it in television ads, read it in newspaper articles, maybe even heard it from your doctor: depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain that medication can correct. According to the chemical imbalance theory, low levels of the brain chemical serotonin lead to depression and depression medication works by bringing serotonin levels back to normal. However, the truth is that researchers know very little about how antidepressants work. There is no test that can measure the amount of serotonin in the living brain – no way to even know what a low or normal level of serotonin is, let alone show that depression medication fixes these levels.

    While antidepressant drugs such as Prozac increase serotonin levels in the brain, this doesn’t mean that depression is caused by a serotonin shortage. After all, aspirin may cure a headache, but it doesn’t mean that headaches are caused by an aspirin deficiency. Furthermore, many studies contradict the chemical imbalance theory of depression. Experiments have shown that lowering people’s serotonin levels doesn’t always lower mood, nor does it worsen symptoms in people who are already depressed. And while antidepressants raise serotonin levels within hours, it takes weeks before medication kicks in to relieve depression. If depression were due to low serotonin, there wouldn’t be an antidepressant medication lag.
    When it comes to depression, serotonin doesn’t tell the whole story

    Experts agree that depression involves much more than just “bad” brain chemistry. Serotonin is just one of many factors that may play a role in the disorder. New research points to other biological contributors to depression, including inflammation, elevated stress hormones, immune system suppression, abnormal activity in certain parts of the brain, nutritional deficiencies, and shrinking brain cells. And these are just the biological causes of depression. Social and psychological factors – such as loneliness, lack of exercise, poor diet, and low self-esteem – also play an enormous role in depression.

    How effective are antidepressants?


    Researchers agree that when depression is severe, medication can be helpful – even life saving. However,research shows that antidepressants fall short for many people. A major government study released in 2006 showed that less than 50 percent of people become symptom-free on antidepressants, even after trying two different medications. Furthermore, many who do respond to medication slip back into major depression within a short while, despite sticking with drug treatment.

    Other studies show that the benefits of depression medication have been exaggerated – with some researchers concluding that, when it comes to mild to moderate depression, antidepressants are only slightly more effective than placebos.

    If you have severe depression that’s interfering with your ability to function, medication may be right for you. However, many people use antidepressants when therapy, exercise, or self-help strategies would work just as well or better – minus the side effects. Therapy can also help you get to the bottom of your underlying issues and develop the tools to beat depression for good.

    Side effects of antidepressant medication
    The types of drugs used in the treatment of depression are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), “atypical” antidepressants, and the older tricyclic antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).

    Side effects are common in all antidepressants and for many people, the side effects are serious enough to make them stop taking the medication.
    Side effects of SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors)
    The most widely prescribed antidepressants come from a class of medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

    Common side effects of
    SSRI antidepressants:
    • Nausea
    • Insomnia
    • Anxiety
    • Restlessness
    • Decreased sex drive
    • Dizziness
    • Weight gain or loss
    • Tremors
    • Sweating
    • Sleepiness
    • Fatigue
    • Dry mouth
    • Diarrhea
    • Constipation
    • Headaches

    The SSRIs include:
    • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
    • Fluvoxamine (Luvox)
    • Sertraline (Zoloft)
    • Paroxetine (Paxil)
    • Escitalopram (Lexapro)
    • Citalopram (Celexa)

    The SSRIs act on a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Serotonin helps regulate mood, but it also plays a role in digestion, pain, sleep, mental clarity, and other bodily functions. As a result, the SSRI antidepressants cause a wide range of side effects.

    Common side effects include sexual problems, drowsiness, sleep difficulties, and nausea. While some side effects go away after the first few weeks of drug treatment, others persist and may even get worse.

    In adults over the age of 65, SSRIs pose an additional concern. Studies show that SSRI medications may increase the risk for falls, fractures, and bone loss in older adults. The SSRIs can also cause serious withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking them abruptly.

    Side effects of a typical antidepressants

    There are a variety of newer depression drugs, called atypical antidepressants, which target other neurotransmitters either alone or in addition to serotonin. Some of the brain chemicals they affect include norepinephrine and dopamine.

    The side effects vary according to the specific drug. However, many of the atypical antidepressants can cause nausea, fatigue, weight gain, sleepiness, nervousness, dry mouth, and blurred vision.

    The atypical antidepressants include: • Bupropion (Wellbutrin)
    • Venlafaxine (Effexor)
    • Duloxetine (Cymbalta)
    • Mirtazapine (Remeron)
    • Trazodone (Desyrel)
    • Nefazodone (Serzone)

    Side effects of older depression drugs

    Tricyclic antidepressants and MAOIs (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) are older classes of antidepressants. Their side effects are more severe than those of the newer antidepressants, so they are only prescribed as a last resort after other treatments and medications have failed.

    Antidepressant withdrawal

    Once you’ve started taking antidepressants, stopping can be tough; many people have withdrawal symptoms that make it difficult to get off of the medication.

    If you decide to stop taking antidepressants, it’s essential to taper off slowly. If you stop abruptly, you may experience a number of unpleasant withdrawal symptoms such as crying spells, extreme restlessness, dizziness, fatigue, and aches and pains. These withdrawal symptoms are known as antidepressant discontinuation syndrome. Antidepressant discontinuation syndrome is especially common when you stop taking Paxil or Zoloft.

    However, all medications for depression can cause withdrawal symptoms.
    Antidepressant withdrawal symptoms
    • Anxiety, agitation
    • Depression, mood swings
    • Flu-like symptoms
    • Irritability and aggression
    • Insomnia, nightmares
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Dizziness, loss of coordination
    • Stomach cramping and pain
    • Electric shock sensations
    • Tremor, muscle spasms

    Depression and anxiety are also common symptoms when withdrawing from antidepressants. When depression is a withdrawal symptom, it’s often worse than the original depression that led to drug treatment in the first place. Unfortunately, many people mistake this withdrawal symptom for a return of their depressive illness and resume medication, creating a vicious circle.
    In order to avoid antidepressant withdrawal symptoms, never stop your medication “cold turkey.” Instead, gradually taper your dose, allowing for at least 1-2 weeks between each dosage reduction. This tapering process may take up to several months, and should be monitored under a doctor's supervision.

    Antidepressants and suicide risk


    There is a danger that, in some people, antidepressant treatment will cause an increase, rather than a decrease, in depression. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that all depression medications include a warning label about the increased risk of suicide in children and young adults. The suicide risk is particularly great during the first month to two months of treatment.

    Anyone taking antidepressants should be closely watched for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Monitoring is especially important if this is the person’s first time on depression medication or if the dose has recently been changed. Signs that medication is making things worse include anxiety, insomnia, hostility, and extreme agitation—particularly if the symptoms appear suddenly or rapidly deteriorate. If you spot the warning signs in yourself or a loved one, contact your doctor or therapist immediately.

    Antidepressant warning signs• Suicidal thoughts or attempts
    • New or worse depression
    • New or worse anxiety
    • Aggression and anger
    • Acting on dangerous impulses
    • New or worse irritability
    • Feeling agitated or restless
    • Difficulty sleeping
    • Extreme hyperactivity
    • Other unusual changes in behavior

    If you are concerned that a friend or family member is contemplating suicide, see Understanding and Helping a Suicidal Person.

    Exploring your depression treatment options

    Antidepressants aren’t a cure. Medication may treat some symptoms of depression, but can’t change underlying contributions to depression in your life. Antidepressants won’t solve your problems if you’re depressed because of a dead-end job, a pessimistic outlook, or an unhealthy relationship. That’s where therapy and other lifestyle changes come in.

    Studies show that therapy works just as well as antidepressants in treating depression, and it’s better at preventing relapse once treatment ends. While depression medication only helps as long as you’re taking it, the emotional insights and coping skills acquired during therapy can have a more lasting effect on depression. However, if your depression is so severe that you don't have the energy to pursue treatment, a brief trial of antidepressants may boost your mood to a level where you can focus on therapy.

    In addition to therapy, other effective treatments for depression include exercise, meditation, relaxation techniques, stress management, support groups, and self-help steps. While these treatments require more time and effort initially, their advantage over depression medication is that they boost mood without any adverse effects

    Self-help for depression

    Depression recovery begins with positive daily lifestyle choices. If you cultivate supportive relationships, challenge negative thoughts, and nurture your physical health, you can help yourself, slowly but surely, overcome your depression.

    Read Self-help for depression

    Deciding if depression medication is right for you

    If you’re considering antidepressants as a treatment option, make sure you carefully consider all of your treatment options. The following questions may help you make your decision.

    Questions to ask yourself and a mental health professional
    • Is my depression severe enough to justify drug treatment?
    • Is medication the best option for treating my depression?
    • Am I willing to tolerate unwanted side effects?
    • What non-drug treatments might help my depression?
    • Do I have the time and motivation to pursue other treatments such as therapy and exercise?
    • What self-help strategies might reduce my depression?
    • If I decide to take medication, should I pursue therapy as well?
    Questions to ask your doctor
    • Are there any medical conditions that could be causing my depression?
    • What are the side effects and risks of the antidepressant you are recommending?
    • Are there any foods or other substances I will need to avoid?
    • How will this drug interact with other prescriptions I’m taking?
    • How long will I have to take this medication?
    • Will withdrawing from the drug be difficult?
    • Will my depression return when I stop taking medication?

    If you use antidepressants

    If you decide to take depression medication, it’s prudent to learn all you can about your prescription. The more you know about your antidepressant, the better equipped you’ll be to deal with side effects, avoid dangerous drug interactions, and minimize other safety concerns.

    Some suggestions:

    See a psychiatrist, not a family physician. Your family physician might help you or your loved one first realize that you may need depression treatment. But although any medical doctor can prescribe medications, psychiatrists are doctors who specialize in mental health treatment. They are more likely to be familiar with the newest research on antidepressants and any safety concerns. Your health depends on your doctor's expertise, so it's important to choose the physician who is best qualified.
    • Be patient. Finding the right drug and dosage is a trial and error process. It takes approximately 4 to 6 weeks for antidepressant medications to reach their full therapeutic effect. Many people try several medications before finding one that helps.
    • Monitor side effects – Keep track of any physical and emotional changes you’re experiencing and talk to your doctor about them. Contact your doctor or therapist immediately if your depression gets worse or you experience an increase in suicidal thoughts.
    • Don’t stop medication without talking to your doctor – Be sure to take your antidepressant according to the doctor's instructions. Don't skip or alter your dose, and don't stop taking your pills as soon as you begin to feel better. Stopping treatment prematurely is associated with high relapse rates. It can also cause serious withdrawal symptoms.
    • Go to therapy – Medication can reduce the symptoms of depression, but it doesn’t treat the underlying problem. Psychotherapy can help you get to the root of your depression, change negative thinking patterns, and learn new ways of coping.
     
  10. 1u29

    1u29 Trưởng Ban Lễ Tân Super Moderator MBA Family

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    Ơ ngày xưa mình cũng có giai đoạn tí nữa thì được nêu tên ở trên báo rồi đấy. Thế mà rồi nhờ ơn Đảng và chính phủ thế nào đấy lại qua.
     
  11. AnnieLinh

    AnnieLinh Member MBA Family

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    Cái này mới khó các bác ạ. Thỉnh thoảng muốn than thở mà chẳng biết gọi ai, bạn bè mà than nhiều quá nó chửi cho vỡ mặt. Doctor hay therapist thì tiền đâu? :-< Bi kịch là ở chỗ ấy, depression dồn lại một cục, đầu óc lúc nào cũng muốn nổ tung.
     
  12. 1u29

    1u29 Trưởng Ban Lễ Tân Super Moderator MBA Family

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    Em Linh check thử service ở trường xem. Ngày trước trường chị có 20 session free. Chị đi đâu hẳn hơn 20 session mà nó cũng chả charge gì mình thêm tiền cả, chắc thấy tội nghiệp quá.
     
  13. thuong1

    thuong1 Nominee - Gold member of the year 2009 MBA Family

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    Duke/Fuqua có một bộ phận instructors chuyên take care sinh viên quốc tế. Hàng tuần có thể đăng ký gặp mentor nói chuyện chia sẻ buồn vui, culture shock, ... Mình thì lợi dụng service này để luyện tiếng anh ... Những người này hình như làm việc nhiều với internationals nên họ rất hiểu khó khăn và áp lực của sinh viên du học, nói chuyện dãi bày rất dễ chịu...
    Có lẽ chị PA nói đúng nên bạn nào cảm thấy bức xúc thì tìm bộ phận này của trường nói chuyện sẽ có giải pháp trước khi phải dùng đến thuốc và dịch vụ tư vấn tâm lý,...
    Ngoài ra mình thấy có roommate cũng tốt hơn là sống một mình. Những lúc thảm quá lôi nhau ra nói chuyện cũng trút được bức xúc ra phết, cùng motivate nhau. Rồi những lúc ốm đau, nấu cho nhau bát soup, take care nhau những lúc emergency nữa... American roomate của mình to khỏe, vui vẻ, ambitious thế mà cũng khóc nức nở hơn 3 lần từ đầu năm học tới giờ, có một đứa bạn chơi thân từng làm ở NYC thế mà có lần từng nghĩ đến suicide. Mình có lúc ốm quá được roommates đứa thì đi nấu soup cho, đứa thì đi kiếm thuốc, rồi tụi nó dọn sách vở, điện thoại cho vào ba lô cho mình, chở đến trường, ... Cuộc sống đúng là có nhiều lúc thảm nên tốt nhất cần chơi với một nhóm bạn để còn dựa vào nhau những lúc cần thiết!

    Nếu có thể take it to the next levels thì dating cũng là một giải pháp hữu hiệu. Em Linh date thử một anh năm hai anh ấy entertain cho những lúc buồn bực, chọn anh nào calm và hóm nữa thì coi như xong nhưng cấm nhờ anh ý làm bài là vi phạm honor code nhé :D
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  14. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Thế cho nên "bát cháo hoa với hành" nó mới chết người em Hường ạ. Hành ta khó ăn thì mình chuyển khẩu vị tí chắc cũng ổn? Hy vọng là không ai phải rơi vào những lúc quá khó khăn mà không có chỗ nào để trút. Tự nhiên cũng cho một cơ chế tuyệt vời để cân bằng phần nào là nước mắt đấy thôi. Hãy nói hết ra cho bớt căng thẳng phần nào. Các bạn đừng ngần ngại tìm kiếm sự giúp đỡ khi thấy cần thiết, có rẩt nhiều người tốt ở xung quanh chúng ta.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  15. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Cái này cũng phải hết sức cẩn thận vì nếu không " tránh vỏ dưa lại gặp vỏ dừa" - vấn đề của chính mình đang chưa giải quyết xong mà mình lại hy vọng người khác giới giải quyết giúp mình. Trong cả 2 trường hợp mà bài báo nêu- nạn nhân đều mới chia tay với " bạn khác giới " một thời gian ngắn. Theo cái nhìn riêng tôi thì cả Drug, Drink, và Sex đều không phải là lời giải cho bài toán trầm cảm hoặc đang bị căng thẳng - mà có thể còn là một biểu hiện của tình trạng đó tiến triển theo hướng tệ hơn.

    Người để trao đổi chắc phải là người đáng tin cậy và sẵn sàng lắng nghe bạn chứ không là người mà bạn đang tìm hiểu và chinh phục. Những khi cần sự giúp đỡ thì không phải là lúc cho giải pháp dài hạn, dating ... vì những lúc đó chỉ " sai một ly" đã "đi một dặm"; Có những trường hợp là không bao giờ có cơ hội để sửa chữa hay làm lại cả. Những người xung quanh và người trong cuộc đừng ảo tưởng là mọi việc sẽ OK. Khi bạn có vấn đề bạn phải tìm người có chuyên môn, và kinh nghiệm xử lý vấn đề đó giúp bạn.Điều này làm tôi nhớ lại câu chuyện hồi những năm 90. Tôi có một người quen dạy đại học ở DC, khi con ốm, ông định xử lý linh hoạt theo kiểu Việt nam về việc cho con uống thuốc thì bà vợ Mỹ (vốn là con gái của một bác Senator ) đã "mắng" ngay là Ông là Doctor ( Ph.D ) về kinh tế chứ đâu phải Medical Doctor mà định tự điều chỉnh thời gian uống thuốc cho con tôi?
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  16. little.nemo

    little.nemo Nominee - Gold member of the year 2009 MBA Family

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    Anh Hà, dating không phải lúc nào cũng đồng nghĩa với Sex, và sex không phải lúc nào cũng đồng nghĩa với dating. Theo em thì hai phạm trù này là khác nhau.

     
  17. little.nemo

    little.nemo Nominee - Gold member of the year 2009 MBA Family

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    Những lúc bị trầm cảm hay căng thẳng thì theo văn hóa của người Việt, gia đình là chỗ dựa đáng tin cậy nhất. Gia đình có nghĩa là ba mẹ anh chị em đối với những người chưa lập gia đình. Đối với những người đã lập gia đình thì chữ "gia đình" trước hết có nghĩa là người bạn đời. Dating thì chắc chắn chưa được coi là một thành phần của gia đình, nên tốt nhất là không nên dựa vào date của mình để mong tìm sự an ủi lúc gặp khó khăn.

    Theo kinh nghiệm của mình thì lúc mới sang Mỹ, nếu có vấn đề về tâm lý thì trước hết nên đến phòng tư vấn tâm lý của trường mà "trút" là an toàn nhất. Sau một thời gian hòa nhập vào cuộc sống mới, các bạn sẽ develop được những tình bạn để mình có thể "trông cậy" lúc gặp khó khăn. Nhưng nên nhớ rằng vấn đề của mình thì mình phải giải quyết, người khác chỉ support được chứ không giải quyết được giúp mình (và cũng không nên để họ giải quyết giúp mình), và mức độ support của người khác cũng tùy vào khả năng và sự sẵn lòng của họ nữa.

    Tốt nhất là đối với các bạn nữ, lúc sang đây học thì phải chuẩn bị tâm lý là đừng có emotionlly needy quá. Ở nhà quen được chiều chuộng, đụng tí là khóc, khóc là có người dỗ dành. Mà ở nhà nhiều lúc khóc vì nhõng nhẻo thôi chứ thực ra chả có vấn đề quái gì cả, nên người khác (ba mẹ anh chị em hoặc bạn trai) dỗ dành tí là cười xòe ngay và êm chuyện.

    Sang đây á, nếu mà cứ giữ cái thói đó thì có mà khóc suốt ngày. Tốt nhất là để giành nước mắt cho những lúc có "vấn đề" thực sự, mà "vấn đề" thật sự thì đầy ra: sắp đến hè mà chả thấy ánh sáng nào le lói cuối đường hầm cho vụ intern, 2 môn học vừa bị điểm F, bị thêm môn nữa là đi tong cái fellowship, nghĩa là mất toi vài chục ngàn $$$, tiếng Anh thì kiểu gì mà mỗi lần nói ra là không ai hiểu mình đang nói gì, đường sá không quen nên bước chân ra khỏi cửa là lạc, ôi thôi, đủ các thứ vấn đề. Nói chung là cứ bình tĩnh, giải quyết từng vấn đề một. Xong học kỳ 1 là vấn đề academic sẽ được stablized, xong học kỳ 2 thì mình cũng hòa nhập hơn vào cuộc sống mới nên vấn đề ăn uống đi lại trở nên đơn giản hơn, chỉ có vấn đề internship và post-graduation job + balance your student cash budget là cuộc chiến đấu trường kỳ gian khổ nhất thôi.
     
  18. nvha

    nvha Active Member MBA Family

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    Lê, anh đâu có cho 2 cái đó là một đâu.
     
  19. dirosemimi

    dirosemimi Member MBA Family

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    Chị Lê nói đúng, vấn đề của mình là chỉ có mình giải quyết được thôi, đừng nên trông cậy vào ai khác. Có người sinh ra đã cứng rắn, bản lĩnh, vượt qua khủng hoảng tốt, có người yếu đuối, emotional thì take longer to go back to the mental balance. Gặp Doctor of Psychology hay nặng hơn là gặp Psychiatrist (with medicine treatment) trong trường cũng là 1 cách tốt, nhưng căn bản là tự hỏi bản thân mình có muốn vượt qua hay không và take actions, đó mới là điều quan trọng nhất.
     
  20. 1u29

    1u29 Trưởng Ban Lễ Tân Super Moderator MBA Family

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    Cái này về lý thuyết thì đúng nhưng thật ra khi gặp khủng hoảng nặng, mọi người muốn vượt qua nhưng thật ra không biết bắt đầu từ đâu và làm thế nào. Mình không biết với đàn ông thế nào nhưng với phụ nữ, được nói ra được giải tỏa được khóc ầm ĩ đã là 1 cách tốt. Những người chuyên được đào tạo về mảng này họ biết cách lắng nghe và biết cách gợi chuyện, hơn nữa họ hoàn toàn là người lạ và giữ kín chuyện của mình khiến cho mình cũng hoàn toàn tin tưởng trao gửi tâm sự. Bạn bè gia đình tuy là 1 chỗ dựa vững chắc nhưng nhiều trường hợp ở Việt Nam không hình dung nổi cuộc sống bên này thế nào, thêm nữa bản thân Việt Nam vẫn còn xa lạ với những khủng hoảng này, nói chưa chắc đã hiểu, mà mình nhiều khi cũng không muốn làm người ở nhà lo lắng. 1 người thứ 3 có chuyên môn, đáng tin cậy thật ra là 1 giải pháp rất hữu hiệu.
     

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